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Urgent help

If you are feeling very distressed, despairing or suicidal and need immediate help, the information on this page can help.

What help can I get in a crisis?

If you are having suicidal thoughts, feeling very distressed or despairing and don’t feel you can keep yourself safe right now, seek immediate help. Please contact your GP and ask for an emergency appointment. If you are unhappy with your own doctor, you can ask to see another doctor at the same practice or make an appointment with a different practice in your area.

If your GP is closed, you urgently need help but its not life-threatening, consider calling the national non-emergency number (this is 111 in England or 0845 46 47 in Wales) if you urgently need medical help or advice but it’s not a life-threatening situation.

You can also go to your nearest Accident and Emergency (A&E) department where a mental health practitioner will be able to assess you and give you appropriate help.

If the situation is life-threatening please either call 999 and ask for an ambulance to take you to A&E, or ask someone else to call 999 for you or take you to A&E themselves.

Are you an adult in crisis?

Samaritans

To talk about anything that is upsetting you, you can contact Samaritans 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. You can call 116 123 (free from any phone), email jo@samaritans.org or visit a branch in person. You can also call the Welsh Language Line on 0300 123 3011 (7pm–11pm every day).

SANEline

If you are experiencing a mental health problem or supporting someone else, you can call SANEline on 0300 304 7000 (4.30pm–10.30pm every day). Calls cost no more than calls to geographic (01 and 02) numbers from a landline, and they are included in inclusive and free minutes on mobiles.

PAPYRUS

If you’re under 35 and struggling with suicidal feelings, or concerned about a young person who might be struggling, you can call PAPYRUS on 0800 068 4141 (weekdays 10am-10pm, weekends 2pm-10pm and bank holidays 2pm–10pm), email pat@papyrus-uk.org or text 07786 209 697.

CALM

If you are a man, you can call the Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) on 0800 58 58 58 (5pm–midnight every day) or use their webchat service.

Nightline

If you’re a student, you can look on the Nightline website to see if your university or college offers a night-time listening service. Nightlines are confidential, anonymous, non-judgmental, non-directive and non-advisory support services run by students for students.

Switchboard

If you are gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender, you can call Switchboard on 0300 330 0630 (10am–10pm every day), email chris@switchboard.lgbt or use their webchat service. Phone operators all identify as LGBT+.

Shout Crisis Text Line

 If you’re experiencing a personal crisis, are unable to cope and need support, text Shout to 85258.

Shout can help with urgent issues such as:

  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Abuse or assault
  • Self-harm
  • Bullying
  • Relationship challenges

Are you a young person in crisis?

Childline

If you are 18 or younger you can talk to Childline about anything. No problem is too big or too small.

Call them free on 0800 1111 or get in touch online.

YoungMinds

Text the YoungMinds Crisis Messenger for free 24/7 support across the UK if you are experiencing a mental health crisis. If you need urgent help text YM to 85258. All texts are answered by trained volunteers, with support from experienced clinical supervisors.

It is free and confidential to text this service from the following major networks:

EE, O2, Three and Vodafone.

These include – BT Mobile, Tesco Mobile, Virgin Mobile, iD Mobile, Sky, Telecom Plus, Lebara and GiffGaff. Some Android phones issue a warning that you will be charged for texting us, provided you are on one of these networks this warning is incorrect and you will not be charged.

Shout Crisis Text Line

 If you’re experiencing a personal crisis, are unable to cope and need support, text Shout to 85258.

Shout can help with urgent issues such as:

  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Abuse or assault
  • Self-harm
  • Bullying
  • Relationship challenges

General Help

Talk to your GP

Your GP may be the first person you talk to about your mental health problems. If you have a good relationship with your doctor, you may find it helpful just to know there is someone you can talk to about the feelings you are having. Your GP may refer you to specialist services if he/she feels they will help you.

Tell someone you trust

You may find it helpful to talk to a relative or a friend about your problems. They may be concerned about you and welcome the opportunity to hear what you have to say. If this is not possible, you may prefer to talk to someone else you can trust, like a faith leader or a tutor.